CategoriesAccessories

Get Your Banana Mag and Morale Patch

банан товарищ! If you’ve been wanting to add a banana magazine to your stockpile of AK goodness, you need wait no more. There are whole piles of AK 47 banana magazines stacked against the wall at GunMag Warehouse, and with each AK banana clip you get a banana mag morale patch! 

*cue clip vs. magazine outrage comments here*

Banana mag, AK 47 banana clip…whatever you want to call it (or how it looks), this magazine works.

If you’re one of those who’re unfamiliar with the Kalash life, you might not recognize the term. I shall explain.

AK 47 Banana Magazine

A banana mag is a curved magazine for a firearm – typically, not always, used to refer to an AK 47 magazine (also referred to colloquially as an “AK banana clip”). 

Banana magazines usually hold 30 rounds, though other options are available: like the Bulgarian 40-rounder, for instance.

A chest rig with banana mags
You can buy a whole bunch of the US PALM banana magazine if you’d like. They’re in stock.

 

US PALM AK Mag

This particular batch of limited edition bananas comes from US PALM (not Ecuador or Costa Rica), having been freshly picked for your enjoyment. They’re manufactured using a proprietary banana-yellow polymer for the body and a blue version for the baseplate for the classic banana look. Functionally, the magazine is a sealed, one piece design, with a low-friction polymer follower inside and a stainless steel latch cage outboard. 

In short, it’s a solidly built AK mag, though most of the folks buying one of ’em probably won’t be carrying one into a legitimate gunfight. Although that would be awesome

AK47 banana clip in the fridge

Banana Clip Debut

Here’s the wording from the initial PR push announcing the banana clip design. It’s redundant, yes, but I need to increase the word count in this article for SEO purposes.

Instantly recognizable and forever dependable, this is the world’s most advanced AK-47 30-round magazine.

The sealed, one-piece design is built to endure with a proprietary polymer. A low-friction self-cleaning polymer follower keeps performing while the stainless steel latch cage ensures positive loading that won’t give way when you need it the most.

The unique waffle and tread design that distinguishes the US PALM magazine provides a solid grip for the shooter during loading and unloading while providing rigid reinforcement.

US PALM is an icon among AK enthusiasts, and for good reason.

 

 

 

CategoriesAccessories

New Handgun Option: The Modlite PL350 Pistol Light

Attention all lumen lackeys, flashlight fanatics, and touters of torches that proclaim performance—we have a brilliant bulletin for you. The folks over at Modlite Systems have released their new weapon-mounted light: The Modlite PL350 Pistol Light. The release of their weapon light is something that fans of Modlite have been coveting for some time. Thankfully for them, it is finally here, and initial responses indicate that it does not seem to disappoint. On top of the weapon light, Modlite has also introduced the “Modlite PL350 Holster” to complement the light.

Just a few of the Modlite PL350s all hooked up. – Photo credit to @Modlitesystems on Instagram

The Modlite PL350 Pistol Light: Casting Light on the Subject

The specific light package that we are discussing today is the Modlite PLHv2-PL350 Light package. There are two more models, the PLH5K-PL350 & the OKW-PL350, that are coming out later with different Kelvin color temperatures and features. However, from here on out in this article, we will be referring to the PLHv2-PL350 as just the PL350.

Modlite PL350
“How far that little candle throws his beams!” – William Shakespeare. He was probably talking about good deeds or something, but we prefer to think he was a Lumen Lackey too. – Photo credit to @Modlitesystems on Instagram

The Modlite PL350 Pistol light comes with a switch and body assembly. In addition to that, the package also includes a 18350 rechargeable battery and a set of PHLSTER ARC Switch paddles. The 18350 battery allows the Modlite PL350 for roughly 35-40 minutes of continued usage.

Packages are available with and without a two-cell XTAR USB charger. The light is an “Out the front” battery change, allows you to quickly replace batteries without tools and without taking the light off the pistol.

Modlite PL350
Here is a gif of everything that comes inside the Modlite PL350 box and few pictures of it attached. – Photo credit to Modlite Systems

Specific statistics on the PL350 light, for the illumination intellectuals:

  • 5800 Kelvin color temperature
  • 1350 Lumens
  • 54,000 Candela
Here is the Modlite PL350 with a duty belt. According to Modlite Systems, the PL350 was tested and fielded by professionals with different agencies. – Photo credit to @Modlitesystems on Instagram

 

The Modlite PL350 Holster: What options are there?

As with any weapon-mounted light holster, compatibility is always an issue, but few manufacturers step up to the plate. Enter the Modlite PL350 Holster. We will be updating this page as we find more holsters for you.

PHLster Floodlight PL350

PHLSTER Floodlight holster for PL350
Here is the PHLster Floodlight PL350 Holster. It has soft loops for inside the waistband and belt clips, features adjustable retention, adjustable slide-contact, adjustable ride height, and can be carried appendix inside the waistband (AIWB) or strong-side inside the waistband. (IWB) – Photo credit to @PHLster on Instagram

 

PHLSTER Floodlight PL350 holster
Here is another angle of the PHLster Floodlight PL350 Holster for your viewing pleasure. – Photo credit to @PHLster on Instagram

Tenicor MALUS SOL Light Holster for the PL350

MALUS SOL AIWB for various Glocks

More than likely, more than a few of you interested in the Modlite PL350 are Glock geeks; this might pique your interest.

Tenicor Malus Sol aiwb holster for Glock
The Tenicor MALUS SOL AIWB Holster for Glock has a Tenicor T1 belt clip for carrying appendix inside the waistband (AIWB), an adjustable camming bar, dual tension screws, and even has room for suppressor height sights if you are into that kind of thing. Completely compatible with the Modlite PL350. – Photo credit to Tenicor

 

 

Tenicor Malus Sol AIWB holster for Glock
Here is another angle of the Tenicor MALUS SOL AIWB Glock Holster for you. – Photo credit to Tenicor

 

MALUS SOL for 1911/2011

If there are a few of you that are Glock Geeks there has to be plenty of you reading this that are 1911 diehards and for good reason!

Malus Sol holster compatible with 1911/2011 pattern guns
Tenicor also has the MALUS SOL compatible with most 1911/2011 pattern guns. However, according to Tenicor, it was explicitly designed for the Staccato 2011 family of pistols.  – Photo credits to Tenicor

Author’s note, it looks like Tenicor only has the MALUS SOL AIWB for 1911/2011 compatible with the Modlite PL350 in the full 5″ barrel version of this holster as of this writing.

More Pictures and Videos From Social:

 

Modlite PL350
“Today is the day😎 @modlitesystems @phlster” – Photo credit to @bigtexordnance on Instagram

 

Modlite PL350
“It has begun” – Photo credit to @mochabear_actual on Instagram

 

Modlite PL350
“Same, same, different, but the same.” – Photo credit to @sagedynamics on Instagram

 

Modlite PL350
“Folks were asking about @safarilandgroup fit with the @modlitesystems PL350. Well here you go, this one has a @ghostmendesigns portal in it and zero issues.” – Video credit to @tacticallysound on Instagram

 

Modlite PL350
“Couldn’t wait for the weekend, got to warm up the PL350. Initial thoughts are that the switching is great, very clicky, and it’s just so…much…light. Very cool. I’ve been wanting a new pistol light to come to market since we started having lowlight matches here locally and this fits the bill. Plus it takes the same batteries as my handheld, so that’s a plus.” – Video credit to @cannon762 on Instagram

 

Modlite PL350
“Initial impressions are..whoa. We’ve entered a new era.” – Photo credit to @matthelmknives on Instagram

 

Modlite PL350
“Who’s ready for the PL350?” – Photo credit to @spartannc on Instagram

 

Modlite PL350 holsters
“I didn’t officially make a post about it, mostly because I was on the road home from teaching, but he dropped out Skotos Holster for the @modlitesystems PL350 yesterday morning at 5am. The good news – they are in stock and ready to ship, yes colors too, with no wait times for these. The bad news.. we sold a bunch already in the last 24 hours and certain colors are already sold out. We hope to stock these moving forward as a few other products that are in high demand. Might even see some of these at dealers as well. Should have some OWB options stocked in a few days as well.” – Photo credit to @veilsolutions on Instagram

 

Modlite PL350 on helmets
“Modlite Systems PL350 providing the Umbrella lighting for this Galvion Caiman helmet. Green vis and IR strobe marking provided Core Survival Helstar6. I’m a huge fan of Princeton Tec MPLS WL/Red task light. Counterweight is provided by Microbat Systems with their Vampire Flathead. OpsCore AMP providing comms and hearing protection. Sensitive item retention provided by Costa Defense with there Squid Retention System as well a NVG mount retention add to the SRS via an extra shock cord with a split ring to attach to the SRS and a small spring loaded carabiner to connect to the Wilcox mount.” – Photo credit to @shooters101_utm on Instagram

 

 

CategoriesAccessories

Lone Star Silencers: Made in Texas with Love

In the never-ending battle of anti-gun legislation, Texas is making some major moves when it comes to suppressor regulations — and they all hinge upon Texas silencers.

Currently, in order to own a suppressor without having a felony slapped on you and getting major jail time, you must comply with the National Firearms Act of 1934 (NFA). Would-be suppressor buyers must go through the typically long and arduous process of asking permission from the ATF and passing a BATFE background check. Though the processing time for this varies, it’s often as much as 8-10 months or more.

There there is the tax. Once the wait is over, you are then required to pay a $200 transfer tax. Oh, and you also have to live in one of the 42 states that allow ownership of suppressors. If your legal residence is in California, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, or the District of Colombia, well…you’re just out of luck. 

These laws have, obviously, always applied to Texas silencers as much as those of any other state.

Texas Silencer Laws

 

However…

 

For Texans, this may all get a little easier when House Bill (HB) 957 comes into play. This fun little bill would not-so-quietly squash the current federal suppressor laws by asserting that suppressors mad in Texas are no longer subject to federal regulation. It will do so by using the commerce clause of the U.S.Constitution.

 

Boiled down: any suppressor physically manufactured and subsequently remaining in the State of Texas and engraved with the words “Made in Texas”, would no longer be subject to federal law.

 

The code will go into effect on September 1, 2021.

 

Now, this doesn’t mean that you can just fire up the ol’ lathe and get going. Cases will be handled at the individual level. Private Citizens will have to file a complaint with the attorney general that a government body is taking action to enforce federal suppressor laws on you. In that case, the AT would seek a declaratory judgment from a federal district court that these provisions are not in conflict with the U.S. Constitution. 

 

Texan Rep Tom Oliverson

 

The man who made this possible? State Representative and Physician in Anesthesiology, Tom Oliverson ( R-Cypress). The good Doctor not only presented and argued for this law in terms of legality but also from a medical standpoint.

 

With hearing loss and tinnitus being all too common amongst hunters and recreational shooters, he was able to present his case and show just how effective the use of a suppressor can be in terms of protecting against such ailments. 

 

The Texas Senate passed HB 957 on a vote, 18 to 13. The House passed it 95 to 51 and — shockingly enough – it even had some bipartisan support from about 14 Democrats!

 

Now, a cautionary note worth repeating here:

“…the bill provides a path to secure a declaratory judgment on the constitutionality of this law before someone manufactures ‘Made in Texas’ suppressors.

That last part is really important. Before you run out and make yourself a can out of an oil filter and then post it on Instabook for all the world to see, STOP. If signed into law, this is still going to have to go through the federal courts.”

Dan Zimmerman, The Truth About Guns

You can read more about Texas silencers online at The Texan News, at InternationalSportsman.com, or via Texas Score Cart. The American Suppressor Association (ASA) always has updates about pending (silencer-related) NFA legislation as well. 

If you’re looking to purchase a suppressor, consult the American Suppressor Association (or for that matter Texas-based Silencer Shop).

 

Lone Star Silencers

There are a number of silencer manufacturers located in the State of Texas. Some of those include:

Dark Horse Silencers  /DarkHorseSuppressors/ @darkhorsesuppressors

Radical Firearms Suppressors  /RadicalFirearms/ @radicalfirearms

Revolutionary Suppressors /revolutionarysuppressors/ @revolutionarysuppressors

Torrent Suppressors  /TorrentSuppressors/ @torrentsuppressors

Texas Silencer Company (duh) /TexasSilencers/ @texassilencer

 

Texas HB957

Via Texas.gov.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

It is currently an offense to possess, manufacture, transport, repair, or sell a firearm silencer unless a person is in compliance with federal law. It has been suggested that this is an unnecessary regulation that infringes on the rights of Texans and that the State of Texas should also not assist the federal government in enforcing laws and regulations restricting Texans’ access to firearm suppressors if they are wholly manufactured and sold in Texas. H.B. 957 seeks to address this issue by removing the aforementioned offense and establishing that a firearm suppressor that is manufactured and remains in Texas is not subject to federal law or regulation under the authority of the U.S. Congress to regulate interstate commerce.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE IMPACT

 

It is the committee’s opinion that this bill does not expressly create a criminal offense, increase the punishment for an existing criminal offense or category of offenses, or change the eligibility of a person for community supervision, parole, or mandatory supervision.

 

RULEMAKING AUTHORITY

It is the committee’s opinion that this bill does not expressly grant any additional rulemaking authority to a state officer, department, agency, or institution.

ANALYSIS

H.B. 957 amends the Penal Code to remove a firearm silencer from among the prohibited weapons whose intentional or knowing possession, manufacture, transport, repair, or sale constitutes an offense. The bill establishes that a criminal action for such an offense involving a firearm silencer that is pending on the bill’s effective date is dismissed on that date.

H.B. 957 amends the Government Code to establish the following regarding firearm suppressors that are manufactured on or after the bill’s effective date:

·       a firearm suppressor that is manufactured in and remains in Texas is not subject to federal law or federal regulation, including registration, under the authority of the U.S. Congress to regulate interstate commerce; and

·       a basic material from which a firearm suppressor is manufactured in Texas, including unmachined steel, is not a firearm suppressor and is not subject to federal regulation under that Congressional authority as if it actually were a firearm suppressor.

The bill requires the attorney general, on written notification by a U.S. citizen residing in Texas of the citizen’s intent to manufacture an applicable firearm suppressor, to seek a declaratory judgment from a federal district court in Texas that these provisions are consistent with the U.S. Constitution. The bill sets out the circumstances under which a firearm suppressor is considered to be manufactured in Texas and requires a firearm suppressor manufactured and sold in Texas to have the words “Made in Texas” clearly stamped on it.

H.B. 957 prohibits the state, specified state or local entities, or an officer, employee, or body of certain local entities from adopting a rule, order, ordinance, or policy under which the entity enforces or by consistent action allows the enforcement of a federal statute, order, rule, or regulation that purports to regulate a firearm suppressor and that imposes a regulation that does not exist under state law. The bill prohibits any applicable entity and any person employed by or otherwise under the entity’s direction or control from enforcing or attempting to enforce any such federal statute, order, rule, or regulation. The bill prohibits an entity that adopts a prohibited rule, order, ordinance, or policy from receiving state grant funds and requires such funds to be denied to the entity for the fiscal year following the year in which the entity’s adoption of the rule, order, ordinance, or policy is finally judicially determined to have violated the bill’s prohibition.

H.B. 957 authorizes any citizen residing in an applicable entity’s jurisdiction to file a complaint with the attorney general if the citizen offers and includes with the complaint evidence to support an allegation that the entity has adopted a prohibited rule, order, ordinance, or policy or that the entity consistently allows the enforcement of an applicable federal law. The bill authorizes the attorney general, on determining the complaint is valid, to file a petition for a writ of mandamus or apply for other appropriate equitable relief in a specified district court to compel the entity’s compliance with the bill’s provisions. The bill provides for the attorney general’s recovery of reasonable expenses. The bill establishes that an appeal of a suit brought to enforce the bill’s provisions is governed by certain accelerated appeals procedures and requires the appellate court to render its final order or judgment with the least possible delay.

H.B. 957 repeals Section 46.01(4), Penal Code.

EFFECTIVE DATE

September 1, 2021.

A daughter of the PNW and engineering administration maven, Samantha Fischer is an often-underestimated pro-Second Amendment rabble-rouser – who, despite her proficiency with assorted modern long guns, actually prefers a Henry Color Case Hardened Lever Action Side Gate in .45-70 to an AR15…though she is quite attached to her AI L96A1 as well. Sam reports on an eclectic (occasionally esoteric) range of topics, here on The Mag Life and other places.

CategoriesAccessories

MCK TAC: CAA Micro Conversion Kit, but even smaller

The MCK TAC is an expansion to CAA USA’s MCK/Micro Conversion Kit lineup. Compatible with 120 or more models of handgun and available in a wide variety of colors and camouflage patterns, the MCK TAC is one of the smallest “PDW conversion kits” available yet — or the more common ones, anyway.

An MCK TAC retrofit conversion kit is also available (and not just for Glock models, either). 

CAA MCK TAC

The MCK TAC is designed for close-in type defensive work (hence the PDW angle), including “close protection” (i.e. VIP/PSD uses), providing what is essentially an add-on shooting platform expansion. There is no stock on the MCK TAC as it is not intended to be shouldered. 

Instead, it is stabilized (insomuch as any weapon using sling tension can be stabilized) as described by the manufacturer below. 

The MCK TAC ships with a special Bungee sling, sling swivel, and rail-mounted thumb rest for added stability when accuracy and control truly count.

The combination of the shooter’s arm at full extension and the resistance from the bungee-style sling creates a steady platform for added accuracy and control when shooting the MCK TAC.

Installation is fast, simple, and largely intuitive (as Travis Pike reported in his review of a similar “Glock brace“). 

CAA-MCK-TAC

CAA-MCK-TAC

CAA-MCK-TAC

 

GunMag X-Grip Banner

 

LTC. (Ret.) Mikey Hartman, CEO of CAA USA advises, 

“Born out of demand by private and military security firms, we put our engineering team to work on creating the most compact and discrete MCK (Micro Conversion Kit) to date. Presenting the MCK TAC. The TAC is suitable for all real-time scenarios in which concealment and speed are paramount. Taking cues from the shooting dynamics of firearms like the HK MP5K, the MCK TAC, with included bungee sling and swivel is the ultimate compact shooting solution. Not only are we releasing the MCK TAC, but we’ve also created a TAC upgrade KIT to retrofit any existing MCK to the new TAC configuration. The TAC rear compartment keeps you in the fight by adding storage for an additional CR123 battery for your weapon light or optic, up to four 9mm rounds or even hearing protection.”

Sling Tension Shooting

Sling tension shooting“, also referred to as the “SAS method” was first popularized (if that’s the right word) by images of the British Special Air Service, though other units have used it. Sling tension shooting is, as described above, a push/pull method. Here’s an explanation (though it uses a different weapon system). 

 

GunMag-Maglula-Banner

 

MCK TAC

 

Brock Trautman is the senior news anchor for The Mag Life, the official publication of GunMag Warehouse. He’s also a cartoon, so…don’t get butt-hurt about anything he says. He’s not making subjective judgments on things, or reviewing anything – he’s just passing along the news.

CategoriesAccessories

Lone Star Silencers: Made in Texas with Love

In the never-ending battle of anti-gun legislation, Texas is making some major moves when it comes to suppressor regulations — and they all hinge upon Texas silencers.

Currently, in order to own a suppressor without having a felony slapped on you and getting major jail time, you must comply with the National Firearms Act of 1934 (NFA). Would-be suppressor buyers must go through the typically long and arduous process of asking permission from the ATF and passing a BATFE background check. Though the processing time for this varies, it’s often as much as 8-10 months or more.

There there is the tax. Once the wait is over, you are then required to pay a $200 transfer tax. Oh, and you also have to live in one of the 42 states that allow ownership of suppressors. If your legal residence is in one of the other 8 you’re out of luck.

These laws have, obviously, always applied to Texas silencers as much as those of any other state.

Texas Silencer Laws

 

However…

 

For Texans, this may all get a little easier when House Bill (HB) 957 comes into play. This fun little bill would not-so-quietly squash the current federal suppressor laws by asserting that suppressors made in Texas are no longer subject to federal regulation. It will do so by using the commerce clause of the U.S.Constitution.

 

Boiled down: any suppressor physically manufactured and subsequently remaining in the State of Texas and engraved with the words “Made in Texas” would no longer be subject to federal law.

 

The code will go into effect on September 1, 2021.

 

Now, this doesn’t mean that you can just fire up the ol’ lathe and get going. Cases will be handled at the individual level. Private Citizens will have to file a complaint with the attorney general that a government body is taking action to enforce federal suppressor laws on you. In that case, the AG would seek a declaratory judgment from a federal district court that these provisions are not in conflict with the U.S. Constitution. 

 

Texan Rep Tom Oliverson

 

The man who made this possible? State Representative and Physician in Anesthesiology, Tom Oliverson ( R-Cypress). The good doctor not only presented and argued for this law in terms of legality but also from a medical standpoint.

 

With hearing loss and tinnitus being all too common amongst hunters and recreational shooters, he was able to present his case and show just how effective the use of a suppressor can be in terms of protecting against such ailments. 

 

The Texas Senate passed HB 957 on a vote, 18 to 13. The House passed it 95 to 51 and — shockingly enough – it even had some bipartisan support from about 14 Democrats!

 

Now, a cautionary note worth repeating here:

“…the bill provides a path to secure a declaratory judgment on the constitutionality of this law before someone manufactures ‘Made in Texas’ suppressors.

That last part is really important. Before you run out and make yourself a can out of an oil filter and then post it on Instabook for all the world to see, STOP. If signed into law, this is still going to have to go through the federal courts.”

Dan Zimmerman, The Truth About Guns

You can read more about Texas silencers online at The Texan News, at InternationalSportsman.com, or via Texas Score Cart. The American Suppressor Association (ASA) always has updates about pending (silencer-related) NFA legislation as well. 

If you’re looking to purchase a suppressor, consult the American Suppressor Association (or for that matter Texas-based Silencer Shop).

Lone Star Silencers

There are a number of silencer manufacturers located in the State of Texas. Some of those include:

Crux Suppressors

Dark Horse Silencers

Radical Firearms Suppressors  /RadicalFirearms/

Revolutionary Suppressors /revolutionarysuppressors/

Torrent Suppressors

Texas Silencer Company (duh)

 

Texas HB957

Via Texas.gov.

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

It is currently an offense to possess, manufacture, transport, repair, or sell a firearm silencer unless a person is in compliance with federal law. It has been suggested that this is an unnecessary regulation that infringes on the rights of Texans and that the State of Texas should also not assist the federal government in enforcing laws and regulations restricting Texans’ access to firearm suppressors if they are wholly manufactured and sold in Texas. H.B. 957 seeks to address this issue by removing the aforementioned offense and establishing that a firearm suppressor that is manufactured and remains in Texas is not subject to federal law or regulation under the authority of the U.S. Congress to regulate interstate commerce.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE IMPACT

 

It is the committee’s opinion that this bill does not expressly create a criminal offense, increase the punishment for an existing criminal offense or category of offenses, or change the eligibility of a person for community supervision, parole, or mandatory supervision.

 

RULEMAKING AUTHORITY

It is the committee’s opinion that this bill does not expressly grant any additional rulemaking authority to a state officer, department, agency, or institution.

ANALYSIS

H.B. 957 amends the Penal Code to remove a firearm silencer from among the prohibited weapons whose intentional or knowing possession, manufacture, transport, repair, or sale constitutes an offense. The bill establishes that a criminal action for such an offense involving a firearm silencer that is pending on the bill’s effective date is dismissed on that date.

H.B. 957 amends the Government Code to establish the following regarding firearm suppressors that are manufactured on or after the bill’s effective date:

·       a firearm suppressor that is manufactured in and remains in Texas is not subject to federal law or federal regulation, including registration, under the authority of the U.S. Congress to regulate interstate commerce; and

·       a basic material from which a firearm suppressor is manufactured in Texas, including unmachined steel, is not a firearm suppressor and is not subject to federal regulation under that Congressional authority as if it actually were a firearm suppressor.

The bill requires the attorney general, on written notification by a U.S. citizen residing in Texas of the citizen’s intent to manufacture an applicable firearm suppressor, to seek a declaratory judgment from a federal district court in Texas that these provisions are consistent with the U.S. Constitution. The bill sets out the circumstances under which a firearm suppressor is considered to be manufactured in Texas and requires a firearm suppressor manufactured and sold in Texas to have the words “Made in Texas” clearly stamped on it.

H.B. 957 prohibits the state, specified state or local entities, or an officer, employee, or body of certain local entities from adopting a rule, order, ordinance, or policy under which the entity enforces or by consistent action allows the enforcement of a federal statute, order, rule, or regulation that purports to regulate a firearm suppressor and that imposes a regulation that does not exist under state law. The bill prohibits any applicable entity and any person employed by or otherwise under the entity’s direction or control from enforcing or attempting to enforce any such federal statute, order, rule, or regulation. The bill prohibits an entity that adopts a prohibited rule, order, ordinance, or policy from receiving state grant funds and requires such funds to be denied to the entity for the fiscal year following the year in which the entity’s adoption of the rule, order, ordinance, or policy is finally judicially determined to have violated the bill’s prohibition.

H.B. 957 authorizes any citizen residing in an applicable entity’s jurisdiction to file a complaint with the attorney general if the citizen offers and includes with the complaint evidence to support an allegation that the entity has adopted a prohibited rule, order, ordinance, or policy or that the entity consistently allows the enforcement of an applicable federal law. The bill authorizes the attorney general, on determining the complaint is valid, to file a petition for a writ of mandamus or apply for other appropriate equitable relief in a specified district court to compel the entity’s compliance with the bill’s provisions. The bill provides for the attorney general’s recovery of reasonable expenses. The bill establishes that an appeal of a suit brought to enforce the bill’s provisions is governed by certain accelerated appeals procedures and requires the appellate court to render its final order or judgment with the least possible delay.

H.B. 957 repeals Section 46.01(4), Penal Code.

EFFECTIVE DATE

September 1, 2021.

A daughter of the PNW and engineering administration maven, Samantha Fischer is an often-underestimated pro-Second Amendment rabble-rouser – who, despite her proficiency with assorted modern long guns, actually prefers a Henry Color Case Hardened Lever Action Side Gate in .45-70 to an AR15…though she is quite attached to her AI L96A1 as well. Sam reports on an eclectic (occasionally esoteric) range of topics, here on The Mag Life and other places.

CategoriesAccessories

Seven Must-Have AR-15 Accessories – The Mag Life

In AR-15 the A stands for Accessories!

If you are reading this I probably don’t have to explain to you that the AR15 is an excellent gun. One of the more attractive aspects of the AR platform is the ability to customize and accessorize the gun. The customization and accessorization of the AR-15 allows the user to tailor the gun to their specific needs. It also allows us to take the AR-15 from formidable to quite possibly the ultimate defensive firearm.

At the same time, for duty and defensive use, the AR-15 is a formidable tool—right out of the box. Add a reliable magazine (MAGPUL and Lancer are my favorites) and 28 rounds of a good soft point defensive round and you are good to go for a wide variety of circumstances.

AR-15 handguard, REIN weapon light, laser.

An AR-15 handguard can have a lot of work to do. In addition to my sling attachment, which holds the weight of the whole package, the handguard is the home for my REIN weapon light and my laser. The handguard must hold the laser firmly in place. Remember, this laser is an aiming device.

Let’s face it though, adding some accessories to your M-4 can make a huge difference when it comes to efficiency.

To that end, I have compiled a list of what I think are the seven most important AR-15 accessories. I have tried to compile a list in order from most important to least important. Yup, we could argue about the order all day long. Some folks might find very good reasons related to their context to tweak or completely rearrange the order of importance. They aren’t wrong, and neither are you. You do you. 

I think this list and its order applies to most people most of the time. Use it as a starting point as you decide what the most important accessories are for your defensive or duty AR-15.

1. An M-LOK Handguard

When I compiled this list of AR-15 accessories, I did it with defensive and duty use in mind. To me, that means reliability above all else. Your gun needs to run and all the accessories need to be in place and ready to go.

When I build out an AR-15 for serious use, it gets an M-LOK handguard. This is what the majority of accessories are going to attach to. Your sling, weapon-mounted light, and your laser (if you have one) will all mount to your handguard. They need a solid home, and M-LOK has become the standard.

Victor SBR, Cloud Defensive REIN, D-BAL steiner laser

One of the biggest disadvantages of some of my must-have AR-15 accessories is the fact that they live out on the end of my rifle. This makes my Victor SBR a bit front heavy. More push-ups needed.

If you already have an AR15 with an M-LOK handguard, move on to number two unless you want to build your ego and feel good about the choices you’ve made.

What do I look for In a handguard?

When I select an M-LOK handguard I seriously lean toward a free float, aluminum handguard with a solid attachment to the upper receiver.

Can polymer get you by? Probably, but the advantages of a free-floated aluminum handguard are too many to ignore.

The security of your expensive gear is important. You need everything to be right where it is supposed to be when your safety depends on it. A free float aluminum handguard is also going to increase your accuracy by allowing your barrel to point regardless of the pressure on the handguard and making sure any additional kit is pointed where you originally pointed it.

I’ve never been disappointed with the offerings from BCM or Midwest Industries when it comes to M-LOK  free float handguards. You won’t regret the upgrade.

2. A Quality Two-Point Sling

I recently sat in a deer stand with Joe Weyer, the man behind Alliance Police Training Facility, and among other things we were back and forth about what the most important AR-15 accessories are. It was a lively discussion. We didn’t shoot any deer that day…

Joe contends that a rifle just isn’t a rifle unless it has a functional sling. So far Joe and I are in lockstep.

A good sling serves many purposes. It can provide a way to carry your AR-15 with no hands either in front of you or behind. It helps to maintain control of the gun if you end up in a physical struggle over the weapon. A sling provides additional stability for shooting and allows you to easily take your support hand off the gun to do work. The list of how a sling can help you do work is long.

A rifle isn’t a rifle without a sling.

Springfield SAINR Victor SBR with M-LOK handguard, Defense Mechanisms QD sling.

I really like my Springfield SAINT Victor SBR and its set up. This gun includes all 7 of the upgrades I recommend for a fighting AR-15. The best part about the Victor is it ships with a solid M-LOK handguard from the factory. This is where my Defense Mechanisms front QD attaches.

In Joe’s opinion, a sling is so integral in the use of the rifle that it is actually a part of the rifle and so there is no need to mention it as an accessory. He has a point here. You notice that I haven’t included a bolt as an accessory. An AR-15 just isn’t a rifle without a bolt… or a sling.

On the other hand, I’m guessing there are folks here that may have not even considered that a sling (and knowing how to use it) is so dang important. This is why I think it should be on the list.

If you are in that group, get yourself a sling.

My favorite, by far, is the Rifle Sling from Defense Mechanisms secured to that handy handguard and the buttstock, the sling is adjustable, versatile, stow-able and, functional.

 

3. A Weapon-Mounted Light

If you can’t see it, you can’t shoot it. I mean this not only from a practical point of view but also from a moral and ethical standpoint. You need a weapon-mounted light so that you can identify your threat. A quality light not only allows you to identify that threat and ensure that they are a foe, but it also allows you to visually interrogate that threat. Seeing details in the dark is important and a good light allows you to do that at a distance.

In addition to helping you see, a quality light helps to make sure your threat can’t see. Denying your adversary visual information deprives them of what they need to make good decisions. This gives you an edge.

I keep talking about quality lights. I’m talking about a light that is reliable, easy to activate (and deactivate,) and bright like the sun.

Cloud Defensive OWL weapon light at 40 yards.

This is what it looks like to stare down a Cloud Defensive OWL at 40 yards. A quality weapon light can deny your threat visual information.

Weapon-Mounted Light Specifications

Image of dark scene that a weapon mounted light would help with gaining visual information.

Bad things can happen in the dark. In fact, they tend to. If you want to solve problems you need visual information. A quality weapon-mounted light can help you solve problems you can’t even see in this image.

On a rifle, I am looking for 1500 lumens or better and I want to see the Candella near or above 50,000. On short guns that are set up slick, my favorite light is the Cloud Defensive OWL due to its simplicity. If I have a lot of other accessories on the front end I prefer the Cloud Defensive REIN to provide more mounting options and outstanding cable routing. Either of these lights is a powerful tool that will serve you well. Travis Pike REINs you with info on the REIN and you can see who the OWL is for here.

Light from Cloud Defensive REIN weapon light at 100 yards.

I am impressed with the performance of the Cloud Defensive REIN. At 100 yards the WML easily lights up this building. INSIDE and out.

4. Red Dot Optic

Optics on rifles have been the standard for years now and for good reason. Optics help you get hits faster. When it comes to optical solutions, unless there is a reason to be magnified, I default to a simple 1 power dot.

A red dot sight simplifies aiming your AR-15. When you look through the reticle of your optic your aiming point is superimposed on your threat. Both the threat and the dot appear to be on the same plane so there is no need to shift your focus back to your sights. Instead, holdover as needed and press the trigger.

AR-15 with Trijicon MRO HD on American Defense Manufacturing night vision height mount

I’m quite the Trijicon fan. I grew up in Detroit and it’s hard not to cheer for the home team. I depend on the MRO on top of several of my AR-15’s. In this case, I run an MRO HD so I have the option of slapping on my 3x magnifier. I use an American Defense Manufacturing night vision height mount to allow me to use the MRO with my NVGs.

I’ve been a fan of Trijicon’s optics for a long time and love my Trijicon MRO’s and MRO HD’s. I’m also starting to like Holosun’s optics and have enjoyed using my Holosun HS503CU Red Dot Sight.

5. Replacement Grip

There isn’t anything that’s “wrong” with the A2 grip that comes on most AR-15s. I mean as long as you enjoy that twinge in your wrist from it being bent at a weird angle when using your AR-15 with a modern shooting stance.

Personally, I don’t like the way the A2 grip forces me to hold my AR. So I upgrade my grip to something with a more verticle orientation. I really like the Magpul K2 grip, or you could go with something like Xtech’s Adjustable AR-15 Grip. This cool grip allows you to set the angle to what works best for you and your application.

AR-15 accessories - grip

With today’s modern, squared up shooting stance, the standard A2 is a bit outdated. Its swept-back angle is best used when prone. I could end up prone, but if I have to use my AR, I’ll likely be standing. I want a more vertical grip like the BCM grip that ships on the SAINT Victor SBR.

5. Laser

If I was writing this article 12 months ago, it would have been “Six Must-Haves AR-15 Accessories”.

A year can teach you a lot and in 2020 I spent a lot of time training and practicing at night. When I say a lot of time, I would say that I spent close to 400 hours with my rifle in the dark in class. My time after sunset reinforced to me how important my weapon-mounted light was. No surprise there.

What forced me to reconsider my thoughts about my rifle set up was how useful I found a laser.

I currently run a Steiner DBAL-A3 mounted on my Springfield Victor SBR. The visible and IR DBAL is overkill unless you also run night vision.

Steiner DBAL-A3 and Cloud Defensive REIN mounted on Springfield Victor SBR

In my opinion, the biggest advantage of a visible laser is that it allows you to see your point of aim without looking through your optic. This opens up a wide variety of strategies you can use to get hits in difficult situations.

You might not need infrared…

What everyone can get some use out of is a visible laser. A visible laser on a rifle is extremely useful as an aiming device. With a vis laser, you know where your rounds are going to hit even if the optic isn’t in your line of sight. Accurate hits from retention at 100 yards are no problem with a vis laser. Locking your gun in place with your body, (like lying on top of the gun), makes longer hits relatively easy as well.

Or looking out one port while shooting out of another? Yup, vis lasers make it possible, maybe even easy.

A laser can also be a great communication tool. When used properly a laser can be a great signaling device when you are trying to link up with others and a fantastic tool to communicate force to those that don’t need to be shot. Yet.

You can learn a lot about mounting a laser on your M-4 from this article.

Lasers don’t have to be four-figure monsters like the DBAL or the MAWL. You might start out with something like this Streamlight Protac HLX Rifle Light Laser Combo for less than 2 bills. If you decide you like the laser life you can always upgrade!

7. A Suppressor

NG2 Defense Maxflo suppressor on AR-15.

I enjoy shooting suppressed and am lucky to have access to a wide variety of cans. Lately, I have been running the NG2 Defense Maxflo. It isn’t the quietest can, but it is pleasant to shoot and reduces the back-flow of gasses.

I resisted suppressors for a long time. The paperwork seemed like a pain, the stamp seemed expensive. I get it. Now that I shoot my AR-15 suppressed, I won’t go back. It is much more pleasant for me as a shooter, and for those around me as well.

There is no doubt that a can takes your favorite AR to 11. Wait, I think I have that backward.

Final Thoughts

For many years, the AR-15 did good work without any of the fancy upgrades. If all you can afford is a rifle (with a sling of course,) some mags, and ammo, you are not out of the game. Train and practice. When you need to, you will be set.

If you have the money and the time, adding must-have AR-15 accessories makes sense. Just remember, adding a bunch of gear doesn’t mean you don’t have to train and practice. In fact, every piece of kit you add is likely to increase your need to train and practice. All the Gucci AR-15 accessories in the world won’t make up for a lack of skill.

Cloud Defensive REIN switch, DBAL a3 laser

In addition to the bright light that really reaches out, the coolest aspect of the REIN is the ability to route the switch wiring efficiently.

 

Paul Carlson, owner of Safety Solutions Academy, is a Professional Defensive Shooting Instructor.  He has spent the past decade and a half studying how humans can perform more efficiently in violent confrontations and honing his skills as an instructor both in the classroom and on the range.

Through Safety Solutions Academy, Paul teaches a variety of Critical Defensive Skills courses in more than a dozen states annually.  Courses range from Concealed Carry Classes to Advanced Critical Defensive Handgun Courses and include instruction for the defensive use of handguns, rifles and shotguns.  Safety Solutions Academy regularly hosts other industry leading experts as guest instructors to make sure that SSA’s students have the opportunity for quality instruction across a broad range of Critical Defensive disciplines.

CategoriesAccessories

Five Reasons Why SB Tactical Rules — Brace Everything

Pistol braces are the most innovative product to come out of the industry in the last ten years. I believe we only see certain guns these days because of the presence of pistol braces. Guns like the Daniel Defense PDW, the SIG Copperhead, the Ruger PC Charger, and DBX57 exist because pistol braces make them much easier to handle. We have SB Tactical to thank for that.

Why does SB Tactical rule? Well, that’s a long answer. Here are five reasons why SB Tactical rules the pistol brace world.

5. They Invented the Pistol Brace

SB Tactical created the original SB 15 and partnered with SIG to produce it. The SB 15 changed the game and immediately sent the industry into overdrive. When it first premiered, it was near impossible to obtain one. They were consistently sold out. I remember being extremely excited to overpay for one on the secondary market.

Draco with SB 15 tactical brace

My Draco wearing an original SB 15 tactical brace. Years later it still works like it’s new. Also, “WOLVERINES!”

Shortly after, they produced an AK model, and from there, they exploded. Everything that could be braced became braced. All based on the original design of the SB 15. Since then, the brace world has evolved and become more refined. They’ve shaped and morphed into designs that are both better looking and more functional.

4. SB Tactical Make Tons of Different Braces

What kind of gun do you have? SB Tactical likely makes a brace for it. What started with AR and AKs has spread to CZ Scorpions, MP5s, 12 gauge firearms, 1913 braces, and beyond. SB Tactical has produced braces for everybody and every gun, and likely multiple types of braces for a single gun.

SB Tactical FS1913 stabilizing brace

This FS1913 brace fits a wide variety of guns, and shows the innovation SBT imparts on its designs. From the Micro Uzi to Shockwave style firearms SBT has you covered.

We have folding braces, collapsing braces, PDW braces, PSB braces, and more. For AKs, ARs, UZIs, Scorpions, Shockwaves, and more. Every pistol AR 15 build kit on the market includes a pistol brace these days.

SB Tactical SOB47 stabilizing brace on AK

The SOB47 might be a more modern choice, but the SB 15 still rocks on my Drago.

They work with companies as large as Palmetto State Armory and as small as Manticore Arms to produce new brace designs for the wide variety of large format pistols out there. The same goes for 12 gauge firearms. They embrace the current aftermarket and produce goods that work with numerous adapters and even produce adapters to allow a greater variety of braces to be used on a wide variety of platforms.

3. The Best Braces

SB Tactical makes the best braces. And, because they make the best braces, they’ve become partnered with industry movers and shakers. This includes working with Noveske, Maxim Defense, SIG Sauer, BCM, Daniel Defense, and dozens more.

The original braces are still in use today. They are extremely well made, designed to be comfortable, and completely functional. Hell, they even look good, and that’s tough to accomplish. The wide variety of braces they make allow the brace to blend with the pistol.

SB Tactical, Manticore, CZ PDW stabilizing brace, Scorpion

SBT teamed up with Manticore to create the CZ PDW brace. This is one of two braces for the Scorpion series.

A side folding triangle type brace looks like it belongs on an AK. The SBA4 does the same with AR platform pistols, and so do a wide variety of the braces they produce. Their braces improve comfort by providing braces that lengthen and shorten to accommodate various shooters. Some incorporate excellent folding mechanisms to minimize size.

Durability, comfort, function, and beyond make their braces the best currently on the market. It’s tough to beat the original, and when the original constantly innovates, they remain untouchable. I’d love to tell you how their customer service is, but I can’t, because I’ve never had to use it before. From my original SB 15 to my latest FS1913, my SB Tactical braces have always been rock solid.

SB Tactical stabilizing Brace for Sig Copperhead

SBT works with major gun companies. For example they help develop the brace for the SIG Copperhead in partnership with SIG.

2. They Give Disabled Shooters Options

The original SB 15 was designed with disabled veterans in mind. They allow shooters with disabilities to not only better handle their large platform pistols but also allow them to wield them safely. SB Tactical braces come in various configurations for tons of different firearms that allow a shooter with poor strength and motor functions to safely enjoy their firearm.

SB Tactical SBA3

The SBA3 makes shooting this big boy easy. Even with my old-man shoulders. SBT started life on the idea of making guns easier to shoot for injured veterans. Along the way, they developed the best product the gun industry has seen in decades.

I have what my doctor calls “the arthritis of an 80-year-old” in my left shoulder. It’s been an adventure strengthening my shoulders to compensate for arthritis, and along the way, SB Tactical braces were a godsend. Handling some of my favorite guns was easy as the weight was put on my right arm and not my left. I could fire my CZ Scorpion accurately and safely, thanks to SB Tactical braces. You can’t beat a tool that not only improves your ability to shoot but your safety in doing so.

1. SB Tactical Fights for the 2nd Amendment

There are a few companies that put their money where their mouth is. Magpul is one, and SB Tactical is another. They fight to upend unconstitutional restrictions and to be a watchdog on the ever-changing opinions of the ATF. The folks at SB Tactical spent their own money to hire lawyers to fight the ATF when they reversed a decision on the use of pistol braces.

drum magazine, glock mag, ETS clear magazine, SB Tactical stabilizing brace.

What’s the ATF have common with a box of chocolates? They’ll both kill your dog.

In the latest round of ATF fuddery, SB Tactical held the line. They organized and disseminated accurate information. They readied themselves and were monumental in having the ATF pull their decision from the Federal Register. SB Tactical continues to monitor and communicate with politicians, lawyers, 2nd amendment advocates as well as the ATF to provide fair and legal guidelines for the use of their products.

SB Tactical has not just chased legislation regarding pistol braces but gun rights in general. They advocate against magazine bans, AWBs, and for 2nd Amendment rights for all.

two pistols, one with SB Tactical Stabilizing Brace.

Both are technically pistols. One just accepts a brace easier than the other. Braces make large-format pistols much easier to operate, and much more comfortable.

When you piss off the right people, I can’t help but appreciate you. When gun control efforts from Moms Demanding Action and the Trace name you personally, you should know you have a friend in me. Judge your friends by your enemies and you’ll tend to have lots of stuff in common.

Brace it

When it cames to large format pistols and rifle caliber pistols, SB Tactical changed the game. Before they came along AK and AR, pistols were clumsy, hefty, and, at best, a novelty but that changed completely with the addition of a brace. Heavy, bulky firearms became more manageable and easier to fire accurately and safely.

Braces might have initially been designed to help disabled shooters, but they’ve gone on to make pistols more accessible for all shooters. Pistol braces are now a massive market that has been accepted with graciousness by the entire industry. SB Tactical wisely works with companies to develop new products and produce exceptional braces.

What’s your experience with SB Tactical? Let us know below.

 

Travis Pike is a former Marine Machine Gunner, a lifelong firearms enthusiast, and now a regular guy who likes to shoot, write, and find ways to combine the two. He holds an NRA certification as a Basic Pistol Instructor and is the world’s Okayest firearm’s instructor.

CategoriesAccessories

The Mute Suppressor: maybe not your typical can

If you’ve been following silencer-related news you may have recently seen word of this: “The Mute”. The Mute suppressor appears to be a rather unusual silencer on a number of levels. Let’s see…

it’s non-metallic,

it doesn’t use baffles, 

it mitigates heat in addition to noise,

it’s “printed” (-ish) vs. traditional manufacturer…

The Mute Suppressor at an indoor range

The Mute suppressor an “advanced form 3D print” manufactured can, rudimentarily similar to the 3D printer you’re probably thinking of, but using what’s described as an advanced aerospace polymer they refer to as “D28”. D28 evidently exhibits some properties that are more like glass than plastic, which somehow plays a role in controlling the heat. 

That’s enough to pique your interest, prob’ly. It was ours, anyway.

The Mute Suppressor

There are a lot of questions, more raised by the company’s release than answered, but that was probably intentional. 

The can focuses sound “forward and away” from the shooter, utilizing something called a Thermal Shroud for self-thermal regulation. The intention here is to reduce heat, mirage, muzzle rise, and sound in comparison to an unsuppressed firearm; that’s pretty much what any suppressor is supposed to do of course but…

Notice that the word heat is mentioned in there. 

The Mute Suppressor "venturi effect"

That sort of mitigation is definitely not what more typical suppressors do. 

The Mute also has some QD (Quick Detach) characteristics, at least when it comes to an AR platform. It attaches to the host weapon via its own proprietary muzzle device.

Attaching The Mute suppressor via its proprietary flash hider.

Attaching The Mute suppressor via its proprietary flash hider.

Mute-Silencer-flash-hider-specs


Here’s what they tell us: 

The Mute Suppressor

The Mute offers a combination of durability, low weight, and excellent sound reduction without baffles. Utilizing the Venturi Effect, The Mute was designed to remain incredibly cool, making it mild to the touch and allowing you to remove The Mute after firing. This product integrates self-thermal regulation via the Thermal Shroud function. Our proprietary D28 material and next-gen unibody construction methods reduce recoil and regulate the heat for less mirage, muzzle rise, and blowback. The highest level in all details ensures best in class performance.

The Mute Suppressor Design

The Mute is a baffleless nonmetallic design consisting of a thermal shroud and flash hider mount. Incorporating advanced manufacturing techniques and our proprietary D28 material, The Mute’s innovations result in a sleek and resilient unibody, with excellent thermal regulation and portability.

The Mute: “Self-Thermoregulation”

As the bullet travels through the mute, gases are focused out the front vent, bringing cool air in from the rear. The more rounds you fire the more air is cycled through allowing the Mute to cool faster.

Heat Regulation

The intended purpose is to not trap and cool, rather direct gas through the thermal shroud. The improved thermal shroud instead uses a venturi effect to mitigate the heat. The average temperature is 97f – 120f even with intense rapid-fire. The exterior wall is tame to the touch allowing you to remove the Mute even after intensive shooting compared to traditional
suppressors.

Mute Suppressor Calibers

At Launch available in .22, 9mm, .223/5.56, upcoming .45, and .30 cal

Calibers available for The Mute suppressor

Pricing

The Mute Suppressor – Launch price $599, After May 31st price is expected to be $799.

 


We’ll be looking forward to seeing how this thing stands up to testing and use. Will it be one of the best QD suppressors we’ve used? The worst? It certainly has the potential to be the lightest…but possibly also the most short-lived.

We’ll be watching for reviews by people who know what they’re about and we may just do our own. Hit the picture to visit their site or follow ’em on Insta, @themuteofficial

The Mute Suppressor displays both noise- and heat-reductive properties.

Brock Trautman is the senior news anchor for The Mag Life, the official publication of GunMag Warehouse. He’s also a cartoon, so…don’t get butt-hurt about anything he says. He’s not making subjective judgments on things, or reviewing anything – he’s just passing along the news.

CategoriesAccessories

Tenicor Velo4 and Certum3 now available

 

Tenicor is now shipping concealed carry holsters for the Walther PDP Compact: the Velo 4 AIWB holster and Certum 3 IWB holster.

Tenicor Walther PDP Compact Holster Options

Tenicor is a Kydex holster manufacturer and training company headquartered in the PNW.

Need Walther mags?

Tenicor Velo

Of the Velo, Tenicor says: “The VELO holster is intelligently designed, easy to conceal, and built for every day. It is an appendix carry holster intended to be worn in front of the hip around slot terbaru one o’clock (for right-handed shooters). Bulky heavy clothes are no longer required; the VELO holster enhances your ability to carry a gun every day, even in tailored or athletic fit clothing.”

Walther-PDP-Compact-holster-Tenicor-Velo

Learn more online here. 

Walther-PDP-Compact-holster-Tenicor-Velo

Tenicor Velo for the Tenicor PDP Compact.

Sentry-Battle-Belts

Tenicor Certum

Tenicor describes the Certum thusly: “The CERTUM3 is Tenicor’s take on the classic fold-over inside-the-waistband holster. The streamlined profile and precision molding create https://www.openthailandsafely.org/ a sleek, intelligently designed holster. Excess is eliminated, and the result is unencumbered and precise performance.”

Learn more online here.

Walther-PDP-Compact-holster-Tenicor-Certum

About Tenicor in their own words: “Tenicor is an American design, development, manufacturing, and training company. We build products that work. Since 2008, we have been determined in our design, development, and testing of innovative and slot gacor malam ini intelligent equipment. In 2017, we introduced our first commercially available products.”

Hoppes Brand at GunMag Warehouse

Brock Trautman is the senior news anchor for The Mag Life, the official publication of GunMag Warehouse. He’s also a cartoon, so…don’t get butt-hurt about anything he says. He’s not making subjective judgments on things, or reviewing anything – he’s just passing along the news.

CategoriesAccessories

Build a better brainbucket: Bump Helmet Optimization

Helmets — we wear them to protect one of the most important organs on our bodies — the brain. There is a specific helmet for nearly every aspect of life, stemming from sporting activities to construction to warfighting. I’ve written many reviews on Ballistic Helmets over the years and the technology has improved vastly during that time. Long gone are the days of the Protec skateboarding and snowboarding helmets that were very popular with special operation forces who needed or wanted a lightweight helmet to mount their night vision devices. Many companies like Ops-Core have stepped up and developed “Tactical Bump Helmets” that were designed specifically for low threat and training missions for the special operations community and those technological updates are now available to everyone in the law enforcement and civilian sectors.

The term or classification “Bump Helmet” describes them pretty well…they protect your head from impacts or bumps. They are non-ballistic, meaning they won’t stop a ballistic threat from either bullets or high-speed fragmentation. They are made of high-impact polymers or carbon fiber and this makes them very lightweight in comparison to their ballistic counterparts. They usually have air vents, which makes them a lot cooler to have on. They vary in the level of impact protection based on the padding system that is in place. Basically, they have all the features identical to the ballistic version, just a lot lighter and more comfortable in every way.

This article originally ran in August 2020. 

So what are bump helmets used for?

The special operations community uses them for parachuting, maritime, vehicle, training operations (search and rescue teams all over the world wear them during training and missions), rock climbers, recreational shooters — especially those who run NODs, and basically anyone who needs some blunt force trauma protection. With all of the current events with civil unrest, it wouldn’t be a bad idea to have one just in case you need to get out of a bad situation that couldn’t be avoided. We’ll get more into that later.

Bump helmets are relatively inexpensive, starting around two hundred dollars and going up from there. Like any other piece of kit, you get what you pay for. I have both a budget and a high-end setup. I figure it’s a good idea to have more than one, so I can have different applications as well as a spare for my wife or kid to use, especially in an emergency.

Bump Helmet Optimization - Ops-Core

The Ops-Core Fast SF Carbon Helmet works well as a bike helmet too.

In general, all bump helmets are lightweight and have an NVG shroud for mounting NODs, light, or camera. There are many manufacturers, typically armor companies, that make a bump version of their ballistic offerings. I will go over both of my setups and the accessories that I have on them as well as other available options that I have seen and done research on. When it comes to protection from blunt force trauma, having a good padding system is important to absorb the impact before it reaches your head.

With the advances in helmets, companies that make accessories started to design their products for use on helmets. The good thing about all of the accessories that go on helmets is, for the most part, they are modular and simple to install and remove. When ordering, make sure you use the sizing guidelines and go with the larger helmet if you’re close to the limits on a certain size. I have a small head and medium-sized helmets are usually perfect for me.

Budget Bump Helmet Setup

Hard Head Veterans: ATE Bump Helmet. $199.99

Hard Head Veterans: ATE Bump Helmet, $199.99 as of this writing. Though it might seem counter-intuitive, there are many occasions where a “brain bucket” would be useful, if not literally a lifesaver. 

Hard Head Veteran’s or HHV for short, makes an affordable high-cut ballistic helmet, which is currently in the second generation of their ATE (above the ear) ballistic helmet. I have an early version of the Gen2 ATE. Not long after the Gen2 was released, HHV started working on a non-ballistic version, the ATE Bump Helmet. It has most of the same features as the ballistic version with a double-layer padding system, MLOK rails, NVG shroud, and magnetic chin strap. The difference is obviously the lighter weight and thinner profile as well as air vents to assist in airflow.

I have on them, my Peltor Sport Tactical 500 headset attached via the HHV Rak adapter kit. Depending on what I am using the ATE bump for, I usually leave it slick as I can attach a marker or light very quickly and easily. This helmet gets the job done and is very comfortable to wear. The inner padding does cover some of the air vents and therefore restricts airflow throughout the helmet when worn. It is also on the softer side when it comes to padding, with the two layers installed. It does the job in blunt force trauma protection.

For the price, the ATE Bump helmet is a great entry-level helmet and is very capable. Since I have two setups and this being the lower end, it is my back up and readily available for my family if the situation dictates that it is necessary for them to need a helmet whether it’s for recreation, range use, or emergency.

High-End Setup — My Primary Bump Helmet

It is the non-ballistic version of their new Fast SF Ballistic Helmet, which is already very lightweight, one of the lightest I have tried on. I got to wear the ballistic version briefly at SHOT Show 2020 in January. This is therefore the latest version of their Carbon Bump helmet and features a new blend of composite materials and Carbon Fiber. It shares a lot of the features from the Fast SF Ballistic with the same super high cut profile, the new Modular Bungee Shroud, and ARC rails. The new materials make it stronger than the previous offerings and that adds to the price. This one, in my opinion, is the high-speed, low-drag — or the Ferrari of bump helmets.

Since you can’t have holes in a ballistic helmet for obvious reasons, the bump version can and does. The vented lux liner in the Fast SF Carbon matches the vent holes, giving unrestricted airflow to help with cooling. The pads are stiffer and hold their form much better than the ones in the HHV.

Ops-Core FAST SF Carbon Composite bump helmet interior padding.

The exterior of the Fast SF Carbon matches its ballistic counterpart with the unique velcro pattern throughout the helmet. It breaks up the shape of the helmet and lowers the IR signature as well as provides more options and surface area to attach certain accessories.

Ops-Core Fast SF Carbon Composite Bump Helmet exterior with velcro for accessory attachment.

Ops-Core is part of Gentex Corp and has been on the leading edge of helmet technology and has produced a ton of accessories for its Fast line-up. The Fast SF Carbon is compatible with all of the Fast accessories that include a variety of face shields, goggles, and mandible guards.

For hearing protection, I use the Ops-Core AMP headset with the NFMI earplugs. Together, they offer 33-34db NRR protection, which is unheard of. I am currently working on a separate review of that system, so stay tuned for that. The AMPs are unique in design and can be worn as a headset underneath a helmet or with a rail-attached kit that can be attached to the rear section of the ARC rails.

Ops-Core Fast Composite bump helmet with AMP headset and NFMI earplug.

The ear cups attach to the arms with a gimbal, allowing full articulation and keeping the best seal possible. Transferring from headset to the rail kit takes a few minutes tops and requires no tools, which is a feat in engineering and design. The sound quality gives you excellent situational awareness with 3D hear-through, meaning you can tell exactly where the source of each sound is coming from. I prefer to have the AMPs attached to the helmet.

For most applications, I will have the Fast SF Carbon with the AMPs attached and either my prescription glasses or Mk1 for eye pro. At the minimum, I’ll have the Helstar 6 on the top rear of the helmet for IFF or visibility on the range. Lights can be attached on a case by case basis.

Ops-Core Fast SF Carbon with AMPs stowed. Oakley SI M-Frame Alpha for Eye Pro.

High-End setup. Ops-Core Fast SF Carbon with AMPs stowed. Oakley SI M-Frame Alpha for Eye Pro.

Ops-Core bump helmet with AMPs and eye protection.

The author with the Ops-Core Fast SF Carbon and AMPs along with Oakley SI M-Frame 3.0. Range Setup.

Bump Helmet Accessories

Helmet Covers

You may want a helmet cover to add for storage and velcro if your helmet doesn’t have enough to attach markers etc. Covers will protect your helmet from scratches and dings. You will cover the air vents and restrict some of the cooling features. Every helmet manufacturer usually has its own covers available. Agilite Tactical makes high-quality covers for ballistic and bump helmets. Make sure you get the correct cover specific to the bump version as they are thinner than their ballistic counterparts or go with the bridge, which will adapt to whatever helmet you’re running.

bump helmet with cover and accessories

Illumination

Having a hands-free light is not a bad idea. You can mount most flashlights to the rails of your helmet. Princeton Tec makes specific lights that’ll go directly on your rails or attach to the NVG shroud.

Ops-Core Bump helmet with AMP, SureFire M300V, Thyrm Variarc mount, and Helstar 6.

The Princeton Tec Charge Pro comes ready to attach to the ARC rail and includes numerous mount adapters to work with other helmets. It takes a CR123 battery and has a 55-lumen white floodlight when you hold down the activation button. You can choose the max bright color LEDs. I got the red and they turn on with a push of the button. There are two brightness settings and you can toggle them by pressing the button. The red light will save your night vision and the light head is attached to a flexi-neck that can be articulated to the position you need it to illuminate.

The old-school Surefire HL1 Helmet light can be mounted to an ARC rail with an adapter. It gives you visible and IR lights as well as an IFF marker. You can also mount your Surefire Scout or X300 using Picatinny ARC mounts adapters.

The Thyrm Variarc is a low-profile ARC rail adapter with some Picatinny slots. It can be rotated in eight different positions where other mounts are limited so a certain degree of manipulation. I have my Surefire M300V attached to it with the Impact Weapons Components Thorntail Picatinny mount.

Markers

Depending on your specific application, having a visual marker (a technical term for light) could be helpful to allow your friends to find you using either visible or IR signals. CORE Survival Helstar 5 and 6 are multifunctional markers that were made specifically for helmets.

Ops-Core Bump Helmet with AMP headset and Helstar 6 multi-function light.

Helstar 6 on an Ops-Core bump helmet.

CORE Survival Helstar 6 in Visible Green mode. Taken with Sionyx Aurora Color Night Vision camera.

CORE Survival Helstar 6 in Visible Green mode. Taken with Sionyx Aurora Color Night Vision camera.

Hearing Protection

Having electronic ear protection is never a bad idea. Especially if you plan on taking it to the range. Since it’s mostly uncomfortable wearing them underneath, attaching them to the rails is not a bad way to go. You can mount Peltors pretty easily with adapters like the Unity Tactical Mark Kit, if you run MSA Sordins, then you’ll need the SARA adapters and some assembly is required.

The downside of having them attached to the helmet is that they’ll most likely be a permanent fixture since moving them back and forth to the headband is a pain in the ass, to say the least, with most headsets out there. That is unless you have the Ops-Core AMP headsets, all you need is the arm attachment kit and you can place the headset over in about a minute’s time.

The AMPs from Ops-Core quickly attaches to your helmet without any tools, unlike any other headsets available.

The AMPs from Ops-Core quickly attaches to your helmet without any tools, unlike any other headsets available.

Eye Protection

Protecting your ability to see is important, the simplest solution is to wear some ANSI rated glasses. However, having eye pro attached to your helmet guarantees that you’ll always have them with your helmet — kind of like having headsets attached. There are several available and are usually specific to the manufacturer of the helmet. Most times they are not compatible with other makes.

I run the Ops-Core Mk1 performance eye protection. They are ANSI Z87.1 rated and were designed to work in conjunction with helmet systems. The Mk1 is metal framed and has a flat profile that makes them less likely to snag on comms cables or straps.

Oakley Ballistic M-Frames are another great option for eye protection. I have had many throughout the years and they work well under helmets.

Ops-Core Fast SF Carbon Bump Helmet with AMPs headset, Oakley standard issue M-Frame Alpha eye protection. set up for search & rescue operations or range training.

The author with the Ops-Core Fast SF Carbon Helmet and AMPs in place. Oakley Standard Issue M-Frame Alpha for eye protection. Solid setup for search & rescue operations or on the range training.

Camera

If you’re doing some action sports, you may want to record some cool footage for later. You can mount a GoPro using adapters that will fit the NVG Shroud. I currently don’t run a camera but I may do so in the future.

Take note that a helmet is only so big and the total surface area is limited even if you have a huge noggin. You are also limited by rail space. Everything, no matter how light it is, adds weight and in some cases becomes a snag hazard. Many of these accessories are not compatible in conjunction with others. You’ll have to make the determination on what you actually need to have on it, just like setting up a Carbine, plate carrier, or any of your gear. It is very mission dependent and only you should know what you need and what you don’t.

Practical Uses for the Bump Helmet

Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters can happen at any time. No matter where you live in the states, there’s a possibility of being affected by a natural disaster. Whether it’s a wildfire, earthquake, tornado, hurricane, or landslide, you would benefit a lot by having a bump helmet or two.

The first responders that conduct search and rescue operations are certainly wearing some kind of helmet. It may take them some time to come and rescue you and everyone else around you when disaster strikes. If you have a family and people dependent on you for their safety, you are no good to any of them if you are down. I am definitely not a doctor but I am confident that blunt force trauma to the head, in any case, is a bad thing and can incapacitate you therefore not allowing you to help your loved ones.

During these events, you may have to go through uneven terrain and obstacles, which increases the probability of you banging your head simply trying to get to someone or getting out of a bad spot. In other events like a hurricane or tornado, the chances of getting hit with flying debris increase drastically and a helmet can absorb a lot from an impact.

If you’re setting up your bump helmet for these situations, from some of the accessories that I have listed above, I recommend having a flashlight and a visible marker. You want to be able to have a hands free light to have full use of your hands in order to see where you’re going and be able to climb, crawl, or move things out of your way. This is also important if you need to render medical aid. The bump helmet increases your survivability and effectiveness in these conditions.

Civil Unrest and/or Riots

If you’re a first responder and aren’t issued a riot helmet with a face shield, maybe it’s a good idea to invest in your own safety PPE or personal protection equipment, as long as you wouldn’t get in trouble doing so. I would hope that if your employer wouldn’t care if you do and they’re not providing it for you. The usual-issue riot helmets in most cases absolutely suck. They’re either repurposed equestrian helmets or military surplus PASGT or ACH (if you’re lucky) with a face shield attached. They are heavy, dirty, and probably not personally issued to you so they’re passed on to whoever’s up on the line and most likely not sanitized. If you’re an officer on the front line, you probably don’t have the option to use your own. If you’re an EMT or firefighter, you might have more leeway and a bump helmet would definitely help protect you from x, y, and z thrown at you while you’re trying to do your job.

A face shield is something that would be useful in protecting your eyes and face from whatever is thrown at you. Having a marker and light would be the other optional accessories that can help with visibility with your partners and having hands free illumination to tend to patients.

Range Use

If you’re fortunate enough to have access to a range in the nighttime hours, which I do sometimes, whether you are running night vision devices or not, having a bump helmet with a marker is a must-have piece of kit. It keeps you and everyone safe by allowing everyone to know where everyone is. Chem lights tied to your hat or shirt work too, but why not have a helmet that can increase your capabilities with having ear pro and lights attached? When you’re doing admin duties or changing targets downrange, having a hands free light source is very helpful.

Everything Else

As you can see, a bump helmet is very versatile and modular to fill many hats, pun totally intended there. It has many more practical uses than a ballistic helmet and outside of the uses I already mentioned above, you can use it for sports to include mountain biking, hiking, water crafting, off-roading, and many more. Hell, I’ve worn one while doing tree trimming around my house and that has saved me from a concussion or two. I can really go on and on with this topic, as there are so many options and accessories available today. I will most likely do a follow up on those in the future.

Doesn’t matter which one you go with, you get the features and capabilities that you pay for. Either way, they can be a very practical part of your kit that you will most likely get your money’s worth out of.

Be safe during these times of uncertainty and being prepared goes without saying.

Addendum

In the wake of the massive explosion in Beirut, Lebanon, it is yet another reminder as to the importance of having PPE ready to go. A similar incident happened in the city of West, Texas where a fertilizer plant blew up. Many of these types of facilities are in close proximity to residential communities and all it takes is some negligence for a horrible accident to come about.

A bump helmet would be crucial for any first responder and everyone in the vicinity of a blast zone where encountering broken glass and compromised infrastructure is an inevitable result from the blast and shockwave. Simply trying to exfil from the area can present problems an be a challenge to navigate.

If you’re responsible for others, ie your family or coworkers, you will be going back into hazardous areas to get them. Power might be taken out so you can expect to be in the dark. Having a light on your helmet would assist you with the lack of light. Eye protection, preferably wrap around style like the Oakley Standard Issue M-Frames will protect your eyes from debris and secondary explosions if that were to happen.

Also having multiple helmets for other members of your family will prevent them from getting injuries during your egress from the area. Helmet markers will make you visible to rescue workers and help you get extracted if you get trapped or stuck. Although it’s not the focus of this article, I cannot stress enough with knowing basic first aid or TCCC and having a med kit with you everywhere you go.

Read more articles by Fifty Shades of FDE.

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Fifty Shades of FDE is a full-time LEO in California with about a decade’s service in a very large metropolitan agency. He’s a husband, father, and firearms enthusiast. He is a supporter of the Second Amendment and a proponent of law-abiding citizens’ right to defend themselves with concealed carry permits. He runs his @fiftyshadesofFDE page on Instagram and writes gun/gear reviews on www.fiftyshadesoffde.com – when he’s not writing for The Mag Life, of course.

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